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THE CONNECTION BETWEEN STRESS AND BURNOUT: FROM THE PERSPECTIVES OF TEACHING STAFF OF POLYTECHNIC METRO JOHOR BAHRU

Year 2016, Volume 2, Issue 4, 242 - 247, 22.04.2016

Abstract

Burnout exists within the structure of the organization that threatens not only the wellbeing of the individuals within it, but also the overall working mechanism of the organization. In realizing the factors, we began looking at ourselves, are we actually experiencing burnout? We tend to look at our colleagues, and the sign of weariness could be seen as early as the sun rise. Thus, one could wonder the matters that are revolving around the mind of the colleague. Is burnout epidemic starting to hold its feet in our center? Would daily high stress level contribute to the formation of burnout? This study focuses the connection between stress and burnout: from the perspectives of teaching staff of Polytechnic METrO Johor Bahru (PMJB). The aims of this study are to find out whether stress and burnout prevalent in lecturers in PMJB, to identify the factors contributing to stress and burnout among the lecturers of PMJB and to determine the measurement taken by the lecturers to overcome stress. The qualitative method is used for this study. Interviews were carried out as a method of gaining data for this study. The data gathered is used to answer the research questions.

Keywords: Stress, Burnout

References

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  • Centre for Maternal and Child Enquiries (CMACE), 2010. A review of Maternal Deaths in London January 2009–June 2010.
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  • Todd, C.J., Farquhar, M.C., Camilleri-Ferrante, C. Team midwifery: the views and job satisfaction of midwives.Midwifery. 1998;14:214–224.
  • Wood, C., McCarthy, D., 2001. Workplace Bullying, Patient Violence and Quality of Care: A Review. NIHR King's Patient Safety and Service Quality Centre (PSSQ) Workforce Programme, Working Paper 1, King's College London, London.

Year 2016, Volume 2, Issue 4, 242 - 247, 22.04.2016

Abstract

References

  • Bourgeault, I.L., Luce, J., MacDonald, M. The caring dilemma in midwifery. Community, Work and Family.2006;9:389–406.
  • Centre for Maternal and Child Enquiries (CMACE), 2010. A review of Maternal Deaths in London January 2009–June 2010.
  • Cherniss, P. Why do midwives leave? (Not) being the kind of midwife you want to be. British Journal of Midwifery. 1980;14:27–31.
  • Esteve, R., ‘Switching and swapping faces’: performativity and emotion in midwifery. International Journal of Work Organisation and Emotion. 2000.
  • Gold, R., Supporting midwives to support women. in: L.A. Page, R. McCandlish (Eds.) The New Midwifery Science and Sensitivity in Practice. 2nd edn. Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh; 1985.
  • Hartman, M., 1991. Midwife-led versus other models of care for childbearing women. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CD004667.
  • Maslach, A. Retention and autonomy in midwifery practice. in: L. Frith, H. Draper (Eds.) Ethics and Midwifery.Books for Midwives, Edinburgh; 1995
  • Rodriguez, E. An exploration of factors contributing to stress and burnout in male hispanic middle school teachers. Florida, USA. 2006
  • Sandall, J. Occupational burnout in midwives: new ways of working and the relationship between organizational factors and psychological health and well-being. Risk Decision and Policy. 1998;3:213–232.
  • Schwab, J.B.,et al, The safety attitudes questionnaire: psychometric properties, benchmarking data, and emerging research. BMC Health Service Research. 1986;6:1–10.
  • Todd, C.J., Farquhar, M.C., Camilleri-Ferrante, C. Team midwifery: the views and job satisfaction of midwives.Midwifery. 1998;14:214–224.
  • Wood, C., McCarthy, D., 2001. Workplace Bullying, Patient Violence and Quality of Care: A Review. NIHR King's Patient Safety and Service Quality Centre (PSSQ) Workforce Programme, Working Paper 1, King's College London, London.

Details

Primary Language English
Journal Section Articles
Authors

Nurzarimah Jamil This is me

Publication Date April 22, 2016
Application Date April 21, 2016
Acceptance Date
Published in Issue Year 2016, Volume 2, Issue 4

Cite

EndNote %0 IJASOS- International E-journal of Advances in Social Sciences THE CONNECTION BETWEEN STRESS AND BURNOUT: FROM THE PERSPECTIVES OF TEACHING STAFF OF POLYTECHNIC METRO JOHOR BAHRU %A Nurzarimah Jamil %T THE CONNECTION BETWEEN STRESS AND BURNOUT: FROM THE PERSPECTIVES OF TEACHING STAFF OF POLYTECHNIC METRO JOHOR BAHRU %D 2016 %J IJASOS- International E-journal of Advances in Social Sciences %P 2411-183X-2411-183X %V 2 %N 4 %R %U

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