Year 2019, Volume 5 , Issue 15, Pages 1456 - 1461 2020-01-14

FINANCIAL TRANSLATION IN SOUTH AFRICA: CHALLENGES AND PROSPECTS FOR THE AFRICAN LANGUAGES

Aaron MNGUNİ [1]


In terms of the Census 2011 in South Africa, the majority of the South African population use indigenous African languages as mother tongue, compared to the minority that use English, Afrikaans and other languages. The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Act 108 of 1996) declared Sepedi (N. Sotho), Sesotho, Setswana, Tshivenda, Xitsonga, Afrikaans, English, isiNdebele, isiXhosa and isiZulu as official languages of the Republic of South Africa.  Even though in 1996 eleven languages were declared official by the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Act 108 of 1996), English and Afrikaans have maintained their pre-1994 status as de facto languages in the technical and scientific field. The anomaly of the dominance of English and Afrikaans, particular in the financial industry, has implication for the development of the majority of the citizens in the country, especially in poverty-alleviation and national development interventions. Without paying a special focus on the dynamics in languages, it could be extremely difficult to understand how issues of power, identity, conflict and resistance are established and maintained within organisations and even governments. The purpose of this paper is to investigate reasons for the persistence of the status quo in the positioning of languages in South Africa in particular regarding financial documents. This paper also looks at some of the challenges the African languages are faced with in making inroads in fields such as the finance, as well as implications for the speakers of the African languages over the two decades after the new dispensation was ushered in. The polysystem theory championed by Even-Zohar assists in putting the role translation can play in the effort of developing African languages and putting African languages into perspective.  It is also hoped that this paper will contribute towards the debate on intellectualisation of the African languages in South Africa.

African languages, finacial translation, multilingualism, poverty, South Africa
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Primary Language en
Subjects Social
Journal Section Articles
Authors

Author: Aaron MNGUNİ
Country: South Africa


Dates

Publication Date : January 14, 2020

EndNote %0 International E-Journal of Advances in Social Sciences FINANCIAL TRANSLATION IN SOUTH AFRICA: CHALLENGES AND PROSPECTS FOR THE AFRICAN LANGUAGES %A Aaron MNGUNİ %T FINANCIAL TRANSLATION IN SOUTH AFRICA: CHALLENGES AND PROSPECTS FOR THE AFRICAN LANGUAGES %D 2020 %J IJASOS- International E-journal of Advances in Social Sciences %P 2411-183X-2411-183X %V 5 %N 15 %R doi: 10.18769/ijasos.592118 %U 10.18769/ijasos.592118